Question;

1- the student’s plea for meaning the goes beyond the accumulation of disjointed facts contains a powerful sentence:” to me, intellectual curiosity is the only constant in education.” what does this statement mean?

2-what is the real difference between wisdom and knowledge?
3-what is the essence of this student’s plea?
4- are contemporary educators addressing this student’s concern?
5-how can this student’s claim that educators look at the past to build the future be applied to our school’s failure to address growing social problems, such as the needs of minority students?
6-how can teachers help students focus on ideas as opposed to facts?
7- what can teachers and other curriculum developers do to respond to the growing body of information?

Answer;

1- the student’s plea for meaning that goes beyond the accumulation of disjointed facts contains a powerful sentence”: to me, intellectual curiosity is the only constant in education.” what does this statement mean?

The student plea implies the need for the teachers to be prepared in order to help students from a wider background succeed. There is the need to formulate a successful curriculum that will cater for the interest of all the students from diverse cultures. This statement may mean that it is important to use the mind when it comes to issues of education, as it is the only thing that does not change. It is necessary to employ the use of mind to deal with ideas in order for the student to be able to be aware of the ever-changing globe. The frustration that always emerges is the situation where we have to constantly look backward in order to invent the future (Henson, 2001, Pp 185). This further may imply that it is not that we do not need information, but the question may arise whether we must always spend all our lives just accumulating information. Intellectual inquisitiveness is the only constant in education, and except that inquisitiveness is stimulated, no education will have effect. In addition, this arousal does not come from collecting information but ideas stimulate the mental power. It can be argued that information is necessary, and it is gained throughout a lifetime.

2-what is the real difference between wisdom and knowledge?

Knowledge is the buildup of information that one has learned about or experienced. Knowledge is all about information and thoughts that we obtain through study, exploration, analysis, inspection, or experience.

Wisdom is the capability to discern and critic which aspect of that knowledge is factual, correct, permanent, and appropriate to one’s life. It is the capability to relate that knowledge to the larger system of life (Henson, 2001, Pp 6).

Knowledge is attained during learning of facts. A person who understands a lot concerning a given subject, for instance science or history, can be regarded knowledgeable. Wisdom originates from looking at experiences and learning from them in a manner that influences future verdicts and actions. It is thus the ability to see the reality of a matter, in spite of any illusion or distraction.

3-what is the essence of this student’s plea?

The core of this students’ plea is that as a result of the rise of the global, information-based economy. Therefore, the skills of young people required to accomplish something in rewarding careers are the same skills they require to be successful in colleges. These among other comprise the capacity to communicate effectively, to work in teams and to reason rationally. This plea implies the need for acquiring more than just acquiring a diploma from an accredited high school. Having grown in adulthood and the amassing of required information, students will be capable of developing understanding that will be past their capability (Henson, 2001, Pp 195).

4- Are contemporary educators addressing this student’s concern?

Contemporary educators have continuously addressed the concern in order to meet the student’s plea. This has been done through introducing spiral activities, for instance. This insists that learning occurs in steps, and each part building on simpler content learned earlier. Others have employed the use of term plan where the students were placed in small groups say less than 15 students and in a large group of 100-300 students. The students therefore will use fraction of each day in small groups and fraction of each day in large groups and the remainder of the day studying alone. This has enabled the students to grow intellectually and be able to reason logically about issues that are of critical importance to the society.

5-how can this student’s claim that educators look at the past to build the future be applied to our school’s failure to address growing social problems, such as the needs of minority students?

This student’s claim can be applied to the school’s failure where educators failed to look at the past in order to build the future. Firstly, the past must be the basis of all happenings in the future. Most of the mistakes are made in the past and by looking at the past mistakes is the only way out to formulate long-term solutions in the near future. Arguably, the past should not be ignored as it formed the basis on which the future can be strengthened. For instance, through past experience, the school will be able to understand the needs of minority students hence formulating policies and strategies that can be employed to make adjustments to accommodate the minority students hence solving their problems in the future.

6-how can teachers Assist students focus on ideas as opposed to facts.

To help students to focus on ideas as opposed to facts, a teacher has to teach concepts, not facts (Henson, 2001, Pp 187). Concept-based instructions surmount the fact-based, rote-oriented nature of homogeneous curriculum. In addition, the teacher has to distinguish concepts from critical information. To innovate, they have to know something. Identify the precise mix of open-ended investigation and direct instructions. There is the also the need to make skills as important as knowledge.

Select modernized skills and establish meaningful connections with students, for instance teamwork or critical thinking, to center on all through the year. Use detailed rubrics to appraise and grade their skills. A teacher can as well employ thinking tools. Several of appealing thoughts stimulating tools exist for thinking through a problem, formulating a solution, and heartening a deviating solution. There must be the employment of inventiveness tools. The teachers should make reflection be a component of the lesson. Reflection is essential to fasten learning and arouse deeper thinking and comprehension.

The teacher has to be original. This is because innovation needs the readiness to fail, a focus on unclear results rather than consistent measures, and the courage to oppose the system’s importance on strict responsibility. Nevertheless, the reward is a kind of liberating creativity that makes teaching exciting and fun, engages students, and most critical helps students find the passion and resources necessary to design a better life for themselves and others ( Henson, 2001, Pp 188).

7- what can teachers and other curriculum developers do to respond to the growing body of information?

To respond to the growing body of information, teachers, and other curriculum developers must develop a curriculum designed to ensure that all students could succeed. It is evident that students could learn if certain curricular and instructional adjustments were made. Mastery learning will include supple time as much as every student requires. Secondly, those students who fail to master the content and objectives on the first attempt could recycle without penalty. Teachers should introduce remediation using a variety of different learning styles between testing cycles.

Lastly, there should be the use of formative evaluation and not the traditional summative evaluation. In summary, there are essentially two elements of the mastery learning process in order to respond to growing body of information. The first is an extremely close congruence between the material being taught, the teaching strategies employed and the content measured, Secondly, the provision of formative assessment, opportunities for students followed by feedback, corrective and enrichment activities (Henson, 2001, Pp 192).

Did you know that effective analysis of concepts requires professionalism in handling academic research Papers? Do no compromise on your grade choose professional Research writers at elitetutorslab.com